Quality Child Care

 

Research on a few high-quality early learning programs that followed their at-risk participants into adulthood show impressive results:

  • Increased pre-math skills by as much as 21%;[i]
  • Increased pre-reading skills by as much as 52% for all children and as much as 74% for low-income children;[ii]
  • Cuts in special education placements up to 43%;[iii]
  • Increased graduation rates by as much as 44%;[iv] and
  • Increased median earnings by as much as 36%.[v]

Research from early learning experts confirms that children are fully capable of learning at a very young age. Nurturing a child’s enormous capacity for learning and understanding can provide the foundation for skills needed in today’s global market, including the ability to be communicators, collaborators, and critical thinkers that businesses require.  Quality early learning programs also help a child be better prepared socially, emotionally and academically for school and life.

Investing in high-quality early care programs can generate a long-term return on investment of up to $16 for every $1 invested.[vi] But, to realize these benefits early care programs must be high quality programs.

Child care programs can include child care center programs, family day care programs, group family day care programs and school-age child care programs.  Irrespective of  which type of these programs a parent selects for his/her child, research shows that the program should be high-quality so that the child will be prepared to enter and succeed in school and later in life.

 


[i] Gormley, W., Gayer,  T., Phillips, D., & Dawson, B. (2004). The effects of Oklahoma’s Universal Pre-K Program on school readiness: An executive summary. Washington, D.C.: Georgetown University, Center for Research on Children in the US. Retrieved on April 21, 2010 from http://www.crocus.georgetown.edu/reports/executive_summary_11_04.pdf

[ii] Gormley, W., Gayer,  T., Phillips, D., & Dawson, B. (2004). The effects of Oklahoma’s Universal Pre-K Program on school readiness: An executive summary. Washington, D.C.: Georgetown University, Center for Research on Children in the US. Retrieved on April 21, 2010 from http://www.crocus.georgetown.edu/reports/executive_summary_11_04.pdf

[iii] Barnett, W.S. (1985). Benefit-cost analysis of the Perry pre-school program and its policy implications. Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis, 7, 333-342.

[iv] Schweinhart, L.J., Montie, J., Xiang, Z., Barnett, W.S., Belfield, C.R., & Nores, M. (2005). Lifetime effects:  The High Scope/Perry Preschool Study through age 40. Ypsilanti, MI: High/Scope Press.

[v] Schweinhart, L.J., Montie, J., Xiang, Z., Barnett, W.S., Belfield, C.R., & Nores, M. (2005). Lifetime effects:  The High Scope/Perry Preschool Study through age 40. Ypsilanti, MI: High/Scope Press.

[vi] Schweinhart, L.J., Montie, J., Xiang, Z., Barnett, W.S., Belfield, C.R., & Nores, M. (2005). Lifetime effects:  The High Scope/Perry Preschool Study through age 40. Ypsilanti, MI: High/Scope Press.